Louisiana K2 ban hurts convenience stores, but is there a homeopathy loophole?

I’m trying not to make this the synthetic marijuana blog but the news on K2, Spice, and other “herbal incense” products keeps coming fast and furious.

This weekend, I saw a Lake Charles, Louisiana story from KPLC-TV coincident with the statewide ban on synthetic marijuana products that took effect on August 15th following legislation signed by Gov. Bobby Jindal in June. One convenience store owner remarked on how the ban will affect her business:

Patricia Maynard, co-owner of Westlake’s Quick Stop, said selling the herbal substances has allowed her to stay in business and keep her electricity on.

Now, that the state has banned synthetic cannabinoid, Maynard is worried her business will suffer. [APB: should be "cannabimimetic" not "cannabinoid" because the active compounds differ structurally from cannabinoids]

“Look how much revenue the state’s going to lose,” said Maynard. “I really don’t understand it. I really don’t understand their reasoning behind it and yeah, it’s definitely going to hurt my business.”

But the final sentence is what caught my eye:

Synthetic cannabinoid is still legal if prescribed by a doctor as a homeopathic drug.

Today’s our first day of classes so it’ll take me some time to dig into the laws governing homeopathics in Louisiana. Technically, a K2 or Spice product cannot possibly a homeopathic remedy because it actually contains measurable amounts of active components. I wonder how long it will take K2 manufacturers to take advantage of this loophole and how much  homeopathic “physicians” might charge “patients” for such a referral.

12 thoughts on “Louisiana K2 ban hurts convenience stores, but is there a homeopathy loophole?

  1. Your statement “Technically, a K2 or Spice product cannot possibly a homeopathic remedy because it actually contains measurable amounts of active components.” may be wrong. As far as I know, all that is required for homeopathy is dilution and succussion (a particular type of shaking/mixing). I have seen 1X homeopathic remedies, which are 10% concentrations.

    I have put this question to a colleague who is quite an authority on homeopathy (we have collaborated on two papers on the subject). I asked whether she thinks homeopathy requires ultradilution or merely dilution and succussion. She replied “How long is a piece of string?” So, now I am reduced to measuring pieces of string.

    A different problem to look for is whether just anything can be called ‘homeopathic’ under US law (my colleague is in Scotland and so cannot comment). We have a US Homeopathic Pharmacopeia and I doubt JWH-018 is in it.

    Joe

  2. “Patricia Maynard, co-owner of Westlake’s Quick Stop, said selling the herbal substances has allowed her to stay in business and keep her electricity on.”

    Either her business model is for shit, or the stuff is really flying off the shelves.

    • I agree. I only learned of this new legal drug last night when my son was taken to the ER. He had a bad reaction and i’m sure many more parents are in the dark about this. I think it should be outlawed everywhere if it put’s people out of buisness then so be it. they should not have their buisness souly based on selling their drugs. I live in Georgia and I am doing everything in my power using every resource I can to get it outlawed here.

    • “[V]igorous shaking dilution” was the point of my post. I think that is all that is needed for homeopaths; but am not sure it is the sole criterion for legal homeopathy in the USofA.

      Just out, Edzard Ernst has a piece in the Sept.-Oct. 2010 issue of Skeptical Inquirer (34:5, pp. 8-9) says that the “mother liquor” of a homeopathic prep counts as homeopathic. I take that to mean the first, saturated solution in the dilution series is already a homeopathic prep.

  3. If this is all they can sell put them all out of buisness. If i go to buy cold medicine i am limited to how much i can buy. I might be a meth head making meth?? you have to be a certain age to buy spray paint. news flash the youth don’t have to huff spray paint anymore with all these legal drugs at their reach. where are the moral’s?????????

  4. ok here to the world of people out there i am a former user of that “spice” i was forced to stop smoking it cause i had sever side effects first it was my heart was racing. i ignored it and kept on smoking then it got to the point i would wake up with my hands contorted in funny positions like it was some sort of muscle disease and again i ignored it but about after 6 months of smoking the “spice” i had a final reaction that required medical treatment i had dizziness nausea vomiting and my heart was pounding like i was having a heart attack. i ended up going to the emergency room 4 times in 3 days after smoking just one pipe of that stuff. i am still currently undergoing treatment which requires me to see a psychologist and i also had to wear a heart monitor and the heart issue has not been resolved i had a-fib not long ago and i do not dobut it was linked to my prior use of that “spice”. i am certainly glad it has been banned but from what i hear from my friends they are going to come back out with it again with a different chemical make up and will be sold legally again one of the spices i know being sold in illinois smoke shops is called “demon free”. im not sure how they found the loophole that allows them to sell it again but i do not like the idea of it i have a bunch of friends that smoke that stuff and i am very concerned about their safety. please feel free to blog about it again

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